Lego Sherlock Holmes figure focuses a light beam on a Lego criminal with a small magnifying glass.

Breakout Board

A white breadboard is mounted on a printed circuit board.

To explore connecting sensors and motors beyond the devices that are made by LEGO®, access is needed to wires that make up the EV3 connector. The EV3 connector is almost the standard connector known as RJ12 6P6C, but not quite. The standard connector has a tab in the middle of the connector, but the EV3 connector is offset to one side. EV3 connectors can be purchased on ebay.com or dexterindustries.com--these connectors have to be soldered onto a circuit board to use. Or the connector can be bought with a small circuit board to get access to the electrical leads from mindsensors.com or dexterindustries.com.

But I wanted to mount a small solderless breadboard to the same printed circuit board that holds an EV3 connector. Shown in the figure above is the breakout board implementation. Jumper wires can go from the 6-pin connector to the solderless breadboard to prototype new designs (see other blog posts for the Reading Analog Voltage, EV3 Voltage Source, Flammable Gas Sensor, Force Sensor, and Driving Vintage Motors).

The break-out board has mounting holes in the corners for attachment to Technic Beams, shown in the Figure below. A couple resistors are attached in this photo to the solderless breadboard to get ready for using the EV3 Intelligent Brick as a voltage source (see blog post for EV3 Voltage Source). I have a couple breakout boards for sale--drop me a line at the "Contact me" link below or grady@hightechlego.com.

A breakout board is mounted on technic beams.